Rear Cross

Section from Round 1 of the 2017 AKC World Team Tryouts thumbnail

Sarah takes her young border collie Venture through 5 different options for a tough sequence taken from Round 1 of the 2017 AKC/FCI World Team Tryouts.

Does Your Dog Turn the Wrong Way on Rear Crosses? (Facebook Live) thumbnail

In this video, Esteban points out why many dogs turn the wrong way on rear crosses and then explains how you can fix it by tweaking your rear cross execution. If your dog has ever turned the wrong way on a rear cross, then this video is for you! Includes demonstration of both the problem

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In the video below, we show you a recent typical training session with our young border collie Miriya. This session is her first time to transition from threadle work in the flat to actual jumps, and every repetition is shown in order, although we've edited out the transitions (time between repetitions) to keep the video

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Happy Hurdle Course 2/12/14

Happy Hurdle Course 2/12/14 thumbnail

Any course with multiple 270s provides handlers with numerous handling options. In the course below, Ann Croft has designed one of the most challenging practice sequences I have ever run. For handlers who don't typically blind cross in these situations, your dog must have a strong understanding of motion, threadles, and rear crosses to be

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Threadle-Rear Cross vs Push Through

The winning run in the large dog final at the 2012 European Open featured an impressive threadle-rear cross combination by Silvia Trkman at a critical place on course, shown below. In this article, we present two different ways to handle this type of sequence. The essence of the challenge is shown in the diagram below.

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Combination: 270 + Rear Cross

In the September 2012 issue of Clean Run, Nancy Gyes wrote the article "Power Paws Drills: International Trends" that featured the opening of a course by Dutch agility judge Kees Stoel, with variations for handlers to practice. The original 6 obstacle opening is shown below: We tried several different handling options for this sequence in

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Rear Cross

Rear Cross thumbnail

A Rear Cross is a maneuver in which you change handling sides behind your dog. The handler allows the dog to get ahead and then cuts behind the dog's path. This creates a turn after the cross. http://youtu.be/4VeX0sN0Gpc

In our previous article, Using a Double Rear Cross Instead of a Serpentine, we showed how the double rear cross can be just as fast as the serpentine maneuver. One of the keys for performing a great double rear cross is to make sure that you stay out of your dog's path. Many handlers will

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Executing a good serpentine in agility requires you to be ahead of your dog on course. However, you can't always be ahead of your dog. When this happens, a double rear cross is the perfect substitute for the serpentine maneuver. In the video below, the handler runs two rear crosses in a row instead of

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